21 9 / 2014

(Source: churchilon)

21 9 / 2014

anniedurian:

knowhomo:

queerbetweenthelines:



Ever want to see F. Scott Fitzgerald in drag?
Of course you did.
(following from Buzzfeed)
The photos were taken in 1916 to help promote The Evil Eye at Princeton’s Triangle Club. Fitzgerald was in his third year at Princeton when the musical-comedy troupe performed the bawdy lyrics [penned by the future Great Gatsby writer].
In a review of his performance, the Times referred to Fitzgerald as “the most beautiful” girl in the whole production.



For more on queer* literature, check out queerbetweenthelines 
(which is moderated by KNOWhomo’s Ruth Elizabeth)

This is so great. This is just so, so great.

anniedurian:

knowhomo:

queerbetweenthelines:

Ever want to see F. Scott Fitzgerald in drag?

Of course you did.

(following from Buzzfeed)

The photos were taken in 1916 to help promote The Evil Eye at Princeton’s Triangle Club. Fitzgerald was in his third year at Princeton when the musical-comedy troupe performed the bawdy lyrics [penned by the future Great Gatsby writer].

In a review of his performance, the Times referred to Fitzgerald as “the most beautiful” girl in the whole production.

For more on queer* literature, check out queerbetweenthelines 

(which is moderated by KNOWhomo’s Ruth Elizabeth)

This is so great. This is just so, so great.

(via moresongsaboutbuildings)

21 9 / 2014

moresongsaboutbuildings:

Basically me but with red hair.

moresongsaboutbuildings:

Basically me but with red hair.

(Source: gravesandghouls)

21 9 / 2014

moresongsaboutbuildings:

smithsonian:

cooperhewitt's Object of the Day: Chinoiserie Wallpaper, c. 1770-80. 
This 18th c. English wallpaper was designed in the style of Jean Pillement, french illustrator and royal painter to Marie Antoinette. 
The repeating pattern of flowers and foliage show Asian motifs w/ a Western spin. More about how Pillement gained inspiration for this design without actually setting foot in Asia.

It’s likely laden with arsenic, but it’s still lovely.

moresongsaboutbuildings:

smithsonian:

cooperhewitt's Object of the Day: Chinoiserie Wallpaper, c. 1770-80. 

This 18th c. English wallpaper was designed in the style of Jean Pillement, french illustrator and royal painter to Marie Antoinette. 

The repeating pattern of flowers and foliage show Asian motifs w/ a Western spin. More about how Pillement gained inspiration for this design without actually setting foot in Asia.

It’s likely laden with arsenic, but it’s still lovely.

21 9 / 2014

21 9 / 2014

assassinregrets:

true story the terrible person who got me into reading temeraire was like “there is a character in the story who is exactly EXACTLY like you” and about halfway through black powder war i was very irritated to concede that she was perhaps correct

21 9 / 2014

thefabulousweirdtrotters:

"Walktopus" Octopus Candle Holder by Scott Musgrove
http://thefabulousweirdtrotters.tumblr.com/

thefabulousweirdtrotters:

"Walktopus" Octopus Candle Holder by Scott Musgrove

http://thefabulousweirdtrotters.tumblr.com/

(via face-down-asgard-up)

21 9 / 2014

(Source: sodaking, via mrsa-tomei)

21 9 / 2014

moresongsaboutbuildings:

unexplained-events:

These amazing underwater “crop circles” are the result of a species of pufferfish. The males create these large, intricate designs in the seabed with their fins to attract potential mates. The females inspect the finished design and decide if they wish to mate with the male from there. The female will lay her eggs in the center of the circles, and the male will then fertilize and guard the eggs. 

Previously, the circles were of unknown origin, and remained a mystery for several years until it was discovered that these little guys were responsible for the beautiful designs.

Source

Human men need to up their game is all I’m saying.

21 9 / 2014

21 9 / 2014

assassinregrets:

GODDAMMIT the only thing worse than losing an item of clothing somewhere in your house is losing an item of clothing somewhere in your house that is the same color as literally all your other clothing so it could be fucking anywhere and you just can’t tell oh my god im so mad

21 9 / 2014

thusspakekate:

greengoldandgrey:

Please don’t forget the reason for the season. 

THIS IS SO IMPORTANT

(via face-down-asgard-up)

21 9 / 2014

(Source: pdlcomics, via dpresk01)

21 9 / 2014

bagera69 said: Hey there. I'm writing a fic and trying to figure out what minor investment tip someone from the future can give someone in 1943, that won't tip the future one way or another. Just something that would make a decent rate of return. The problem is the only thing I can think to give them is connected to the whole PC revolution. I know there were more immediate investments that paid well during WWII and shortly after. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

historicallyaccuratesteve:

Oh gosh, I know next to nothing about the post-war economic situation (or at least nothing specific enough to be of much help). Emerging technologies might be too high a rate of return, but computers (IBM) and television both gained traction after the War. Smaller but no less profitable post-War investments might be household technology like air conditioning systems, Kitchenaid products, vacuum cleaners, refrigerators, etc.

Or you could have the future character suggest to the past character to do what my Aunt Maude* did: invest any extra cash she had in Coca-Cola from about 1940 onward and sit on the stocks for the rest of her life. Believe me when I say that sixty years’ worth of Coca-Cola stock has a serious return on investment.

*Not actually my aunt, but we call her Aunt Maude anyway.

21 9 / 2014

(Source: snipsons, via mmmsimpsons)